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When summer begins to take hold, it becomes more important than ever to mow, water, and fertilize a lawn and tend to your landscaping to keep it looking great. However, that green, luscious lawn that you might work quite hard to maintain is not the best thing for the environment. “Green” is not always green, in this regard. More often, all your labor and expenses wind up producing a lot of waste and having a negative impact on Mother Earth.

Here are six great tips for keeping your garden eco-friendly:

  • Plant more trees. This tip comes with a multitude of benefits. First, you can create shaded spots in your yard without having to install a costly gazebo or extend your verandah. The natural appeal of your property can also increase when you plant the right types of trees. Strategically placing those trees can also help to protect some parts of your home from the heat of the summer sun. This will keep your power bill down as you won’t need to spend as much on keeping your home cool.

  • Start a compost pile. You can start turning your house’s organic waste into a valuable source of nutrients for your yard. If you would rather not have one yourself, you can find composting services that will take your waste materials and turn them into compost for you. The resulting compost is wonderful for keeping your lawn and plants lush and green during the warmer months, and this type of mulch-like substance can also help to retain moisture without the need for more watering.
  • Cut down on your water use. Much of the water use for the average household goes into landscaping and yard maintenance. If you don’t have one, consider installing a water-saving irrigation system that will also reduce a lot of your manual labor. If you do have one already, make sure that there are no leaks and keep an eye on how much water it is using.
  • Upgrade your watering system. Consider installing a greywater irrigation system. These recycle water that is put down the drain in your home. While greywater is not safe to drink, it is considered safe for use in landscaping and to put into the soil. You can seriously cut down on the amount of perfectly potable drinking water that will otherwise be used for your gardening needs.
  • Choose the right plants. Look for plants that naturally adapt well to your local climate. They don’t necessarily have to be local, and in some cases, you don’t want certain native plants in your yard. But picking the right plants means that you won’t need to maintain them as much.
  • Do you really need to water the lawn? Before you water your lawn during the warmer months, think about if it’s necessary. You should only water when your lawn starts to show signs that it needs moisture. Otherwise, you are better off just letting it move into a naturally dormant state, as grass tends to do during summer. When you do decide that it’s time to water, try to do so when the sun is not fully up, like in the evening or even at night if you can. This will reduce the amount of water that evaporates before it can soak into your lawn and soil.

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